Monthly Archives: May 2017

Program – Laura Patrick – Burke Health Network

Burke Health Network is just getting started in our area. Laura Patrick, member coordinator, and Deedra Epley, network coordinator, told us about the organization. They are funded by the Duke Endowment and the Blue Ridge HealthCare Foundation helps manage their grant. Burke Health Network helps about 60 patients (uninsured, making $23k or less) a month get the health care they need – physical and mental health. Many people find out about them by going to a clinic like Good Samaritan East. They are getting their offices, materials, and the like set up at this time.

The documents above include eligibility requirements and documentation needed. A person is accepted into the program for a period of one year. If you know someone who may need the services offered, have them contact Joann Street, member coordinator at  212-4169 to make an appointment.

RYLA Leadership Camp Attendees

Each summer, our club sends students chosen for their leadership potential to the Rotary Youth Leadership Camp in Brevard. 60 rising junior and seniors from across western North Carolina will be attending this event at Camp Pisgah in June. The camp will offer team building, leadership, service projects and fellowship activities. Wednesday will be the service day. Thursday, they go tubing down the French Broad River. One day, they will have a motivational speaker and lunch with Rotarians. This is an amazing opportunity.

We supplied information to Draughn, East Burke and Hallyburton and requested interested students apply. From the application and interviews, we selected 3 students from Hallyburton Academy to attend this year. The cost to our club is $600 per student.

Service – Hallyburton Academy Spring Fling

For several years, our club has helped sponsor a Spring Fling at Hallyburton for graduating seniors. This includes games and activities along with a cookout for lunch. Friday, May 26 was the date of this year’s event. The picture is from the school’s web site from the 2015 event.

Planning for 2017-2018

The Rotary Club year runs July 1 – June 30. Planning has already started for the new year. Meetings were held on May 11 and May 25 with 9-10 board members members in attendance at each to go over service projects, fundraising, socials, the budget and more. We are continuously working to make our club better to meet the needs of our members and our community.

Board for 2017-2018
President – Beth Heile
President Elect – Maryann Diamond
President Nominee – Kristina Mercer
Secretary – Thomas Winfield
Treasurer – Annette Brinkley
Sergeant-at-Arms – Tim Horldt
Past President – Jon Mercer

Club – Lu Litton Griffin
Community – Kevin Frederick
Foundation – Bruce Bingham
Fund Raising – Kristina Mercer
International – Paul Mears
Membership – Ted Carothers
Youth – Jeff Carter
Past Presidents – Chuck Moseley
Vocational – Melanie Townsend

Member-at-large -Jim Brookes

Program – CART – Bruce, Thomas and John

On May 9, Bruce, John and Thomas traveled to Columbia, SC for the annual meeting and presentation of money for research to cure Alzheimer’s disease. At today’s meeting, they presented what they learned.

Our Rotary District 7670 raised $90,000 for Alzheimer’s research this year. Our Rotary area in the Southeastern US that supports CART raised $700,000 to hand out as grants. These grants are awarded to researchers with new ideas to help them get a start and get recognition from larger funding sources.

5 million people in the US have Alzheimer’s disease. It is the 6th leading cause of death.

More facts about CART (Coins for Alzheimer’s Research Trust)

  • 100 % of every dollar goes to research
  • $6.5M in grants distributed 1999-2017

District Training

On Saturday, May 20, Maryann, Thomas and Beth attended District 7670 Training in Asheville. They learned the goals of District Governor Bill Biddle and attended breakout sessions on topics such as fundraising, foundation, youth, secretary. For the 2017-2018 club year that starts on July 1, they will serve at

  • Beth – President
  • Maryann – President-Elect
  • Thomas – Secretary

Service – Meals on Wheels

Our club delivers Meals on Wheels on Wednesday morning. Meals are picked up at 10am at the Teacher’s Cottage and delivered to 6 homes in Valdese. Members enjoy socializing with the meal recipients as this may be the only visit the person will get that day.

These club members are on a rotating schedule to drive the route – Beth Heile, James Sweezy, Annette Brinkley and the Bleynats. The Whisenants covered the route for years and recently needed to cut back.

There is also a group that meets at the Teacher’s Cottage to receive meals and we will be supplying bingo game prizes for them.

Program – Richie Whisenant – Police Body Cams

Rotarians Elsie and Richard Whisenant sponsored the program – their son Richie who has been on the police force for over 30 years. He actually presented a program 30 years ago about being a rookie cop. Today he focused on Body Worn Camera (BWC), the rules and all that goes with it. He was a Captain with the Greensboro Police Department and this is their policy.

Richie said the cameras have cleared officers in more cases than shown a bad officer.  90 hours of video are recorded each day and saved 90 days or 3 years depending on the event. Cameras are very expensive. Greensboro created a Police foundation to collect private funds to help pay for the cameras and data storage.

 

 

Rotary District Grant – Valdese Area Ministerial Association

The Rotary Club of Valdese is in a district with about 50 other clubs. We are able to apply for matching grant money from the district. Last year, we were awarded a grant for Stop Hunger Now. This year, we are submitting for the Valdese Area Ministerial Association. We will learn in August if we have been awarded the grant ($3000 = $1500 from district + $1500 from our club).

The Valdese Area Ministerial Association meets monthly and coordinates the needs of the community. The ministers make sure basic needs are met and there is no wasted overlap between projects. Association church congregations support the other churches in the group with donations (of goods, money and service) for their program. These are the churches and their outreach missions:

First United Methodist Church Valdese (FUMCV) –
• Hygiene Closet (cleaning supplies and personal hygiene) – First Monday of the Month – 80 people served per month
• Backpack Ministries (food for children to take home from school during school year and delivered to home in summer) – every week during school year and summer – 30 kids served at Valdese Elem, Heritage Middle, Draughn HS
• Food Truck – (extra food from Metrolina Food Bank brought in on large truck) – 2 times a year – averages 175 families served at each event

Waldensian Presbyterian Church (WPC) –
• Food Pantry (food is from church garden and non-perishable food collected from community) – Thursday 2-4 pm, 120 served per month
• Garden – one acre garden raising produce for the church’s Community Assistance Ministry which also serves approximately 150 families per month. The garden produce is also distributed through the Valdese housing authority and their three low income housing projects. Last year nearly a ton of food was raised.

Valdese First Christian Church (VFCC) –
• Dry Bottoms (diapers and baby hygiene), 2nd and 4th Tues, 2-4pm – 50 people served per month

Valdese Cornerstone Baptist (VCB) –
• School Supplies (distributed in August at the start of the school year), 100 students served via identified by teachers

Valdese First Baptist (VFB) –
• Clothing Closet (used clothing donated from community) – Every Tuesday, 2-4pm – need donations of new underwear and socks – averages 50 served per month

Valdese Mount Calvary Baptist (VMCB) –
• My Essentials Pantry – (rice & beans, small bag of cleaning, hygiene, other food) – can stop in once a month – 20 people served a month
• Backpacks Hallyburton Academy (alternative middle and high school) – 1 weekend/month, 21 students served

Drexel First Baptist Church (DFBC) –
• Backpacks Hallyburton Academy (alternative school) – 2 weekends/month, 21 students served
• BREAD – Food Ministry – 2nd Sunday of the Month, 80 families served

Rutherford College Abernethy Memorial United Methodist Church (RCAMUMC)–
• Food Pantry – provides food last Saturday of the month, some over-the-counter medicines and hygiene products. Grant money would be used to purchase feminine hygiene products 300 families served

The $3000 from the District Grant ($1500 from district and $1500 matching from Valdese Rotary) will be divided across alliance projects that need supplies purchased. Project leaders often spend more time shopping and stocking than distributing and interacting with recipients.

Rotarian Volunteer Hours for shopping with grant money and stocking shelves with purchases, 6 hours (would include 2 different shopping trips with stocking – just one big dump may be overwhelming) for each (9 ministries) with 2 members assigned to each shopping trip – 6 hours x 9 projects x 2 members = 108 hours.

The allocation of money will be

• Hygiene Closet (FUMCV) $330
• Backpacks (FUMCV) $330
• Food Pantry (WPC) $330
• Dry Bottoms (VFCC) $330
• School Supplies (VCB) $360
• Clothing Closet (VFB) $330
• Essentials (VMCB) $330
• Backpacks(VMCB & DFBC) $330
• Food Pantry (RCAMUMC) $330

Rotarian Volunteer Hours at church projects – no money provided for this part, just service hours to support the alliance

Food Truck – 2 truck days – 6 people x 2 hours = 24 service hours
Garden Day – 10 people x 2 hours x 2 times = 40 service hours
Clothing Closet – 2 work days x 4 people x 2 hours = 16 hours
BREAD – 2 work days x 4 people x 2 hours = 16 hours
Total for non-money projects= 100 Hours

Total Rotarian Hours for Project = 208 Hours

 

 

CART Annual Meeting – Alzheimer’s Research

Bruce, John and Thomas traveled to Columbia, SC for the annual meeting and presentation of money for research to cure Alzheimer’s disease.

The CART Fund provides funds for cutting edge research to cure Alzheimer’s disease. CART started in 1996 with Rotarians voluntarily emptying their pockets and purses of change at weekly meetings.